Sous-Vide Baked Potato?

Is it possible to make a Sous-Vide baked potato? 


You know, Sous Vide the inside of the potato, and then put it in the oven to crisp up the skin. 

 If it’s possible, then how long should you cook it (per potato) Sous-Vide?

Try this! https://recipes.anovaculinary.com/recipe/sous-vide-butter-poached-potatoes, or even better: http://bfy.tw/Wlr

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Lots of great sous vide mashed potato recipes.

My favorite way for baked potatoes involves the microwave although it works fine without microwaving.

Cut medium potato in 1/2

Microwave 1 minute.

Place in oven or toaster oven for about 20 minutes.  The top (cut part) of the potato will puff up and brown when the potato Is done.

The puffed up potato tastes as good or better than the skin and looks very impressive.

Microwaving for 1 minute cut the baking time in half and the potato is always cooked though when the top is puffed. Even a soft skinned or new potato has that baked flavour.


So, in other words it can’t be done… :frowning:

There is no “can’t” unless you’ve tried first :slight_smile:


The enemy of crispy skin is moisture, and the one thing that cooking sous vide is good for is preserving moisture. So if you were willing to give it a go, I reckon you would need to APC the potato, then dry the outside with paper towels, then use a blowtorch to Maillard the outside. 

@Simon_C said:
The enemy of crispy skin is moisture, and the one thing that cooking sous vide is good for is preserving moisture. So if you were willing to give it a go, I reckon you would need to APC the potato, then dry the outside with paper towels, then use a blowtorch to Maillard the outside. 


Yes that would be do-able. Is there a formula for how long to cook the potato according to its weight?

Also, what type of potato would be best for a suos-vide baked potato?

I’m wondering if the best way might not be to then deep fry the potato - cook it sous-vide, dry it off, and then deep fry it until it’s crispy on the outside. That would involve doing a much shorter second cook, so it wouldn’t change the inside so much. 

OK, as for the question “what type of potato would be best for a suos-vide baked potato” the answer (according to the Food Lab book) is either Russet or Idaho. Still looking for a formula for how long to cook the potato…

@CanadianDot said:
I’m wondering if the best way might not be to then deep fry the potato - cook it sous-vide, dry it off, and then deep fry it until it’s crispy on the outside. That would involve doing a much shorter second cook, so it wouldn’t change the inside so much. 

We alway roll our potatoes in olive oil, then salt the skins heavily before baking - produces a really tasty, crispy skin.
Not sure you would want to torch/Searzall it though - likely to catch on fire :slight_smile:  Might be good to broil it afterwards - maybe preheat the oven to about 450-500F so you know you’re going to get that good searing action right away - 15-20 mins should do it.  (and, really, it’s next to impossible to cook a baked potato too much) :wink:

@fischersd said: We alway roll our potatoes in olive oil, then salt the skins heavily before baking - produces a really tasty, crispy skin.

This also works really good for when cooking Cornish hens…

@AngelArs said:
This also works really good for when cooking Cornish hens… 

:slight_smile:  We do similar with regular chickens we cook on the rotisserie on the BBQ.  Olive oil, then montreal chicken spice. Don’t take them off until the skin is super crispy!!! :slight_smile:  (often falling off of the bone) :slight_smile:
> @AngelArs said: > OK, as for the question "what type of potato would be best for a suos-vide baked potato" the answer (according to the Food Lab book) is either Russet or Idaho. Still looking for a formula for how long to cook the potato...

Did you ever try this? If so, what temp and how long? I want to do the same thing and either finish in the oven or deep fry... Thanks.

I know it’s been a while. Just came upon this through Google. I did an experiment this morning. Sous vide baked potato: bagged and zipped a potato and cooked at 190F for a couple hours. Pulled from the bag, rubbed with oil and salt, and popped in the air fryer for about 5 minutes. Holy cow, this thing is good. The texture is almost like a mashed potato inside a potato skin!

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Looks like I’m having a sous vide potato tonight for dinner…

With a Russet the best temp is 195 @ around 45 minutes to an hour (depending on size).

Rub some some butter on the potato, and place in the bag so it has time to marinate its goodness throughout the potato, then sous vide it. Tip: Two small ones work better than one big one. Enjoy.

Excellent potato! I further recommend poking some holes with a fork in the spuds before the sous vide bath - the buttery goodness soaks right in. PRO TIP: rather than EVOO, try a bit of bacon fat or ghee with the coarse salt.

So according to The Idaho Potato Council the optimal temp for the perfect baked spud is 210F, below that, the texture may still be too dense, and above that, it may become a gummy. Also oil at the end last 10-15 mins, NOT the beginning to allow the skin to crisp. We hold them dry bagged @ 195-200, pull em, oil and salt 450F about 5 min., perfect, every friggin time.

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A America’s Test Kitchen recipe for “best baked potatoes” cooks them in an oven until the temp measured with a quick read thermometer is 205F. I’m interested in trying to sous vide baked potatoes, so I will try it at 205F to see if I can replicate their results. Following their recipe in the oven takes about 1 hr 10 minutes. After the potatoes reach 205F, they coat them in vegetable oil and put them back in the oven for another 10 minutes to crisp the skin.

Hey Doc, are you baking or using the SV technique? There’s a considerable difference, - like trying to steam cook French Fried Potatoes.

Prepare to be disappointed trying to get crispy potato skin at 205F.

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