Chicken wings - sous vide and smoker bbq

I’m looking for a recipe for chicken wings that starts with cooking them sous vide and ends by putting them on a smoker bbq instead of frying them in oil.

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JR, if you are a wing lover prepare yourself to be disappointed.

Where i live folks like their wings falling apart done. Not me, I prefer a little more bite and pull to the wing ritual. No matter how done, crisp skin is a given which won’t happen in a smoker unless you undo all the good results SV cooking gives you. Think of wings as white meat that will toughen and dry from overcooking.

I suggest you try small batch for evaluation and make adjustments to time and temperature to suit your expectations.
Here’s how i would do them:
Tips off. Save for stock. (wings and backs make the best chicken stock)
Separate at the remaining joint.
Season with salt, package and seal.
SV Cook in 163ᴼF preheated water for 90 minutes.
Meanwhile prepare your smoker and stabilize its temperature at about 220ᴼF.
Decant wings from bag. Don’t dry them. Seasoning optional.
Smoke wings for about 30 minutes as far away from heat source as possible. They’re already fully cooked.
After 20 minutes check a drumette for smokiness and doneness. It might suit you. Keep checking about every 10 minutes.

Keep a record of your time and temperature and any adjustments necessary for your next batch.

Thanks for the info. I think I’ll just make them on the pellet smoker.

JR, that makes sense. You will have a better outcome.
And use a thermometer.

There appears to be a contemporary fad of combining cooking techniques which never appealed to me. Like foam on every plate in restaurants, it disappeared once everyone was doing it.

I’ve been BBQing for years and always use a thermometer.

Foam?

@jr1499 Try brining the wings for a short time then dry and coat with baking powder before cooking. They will be crispier.

Thanks. Any particular brine you’d suggest for wings?

I always make a 4% brine, the same as sea water.

I’ve seen others go as high as 8%.

Thank you. 8% seems high.

Regarding the use of baking powder, i avoid those brands using aluminum in the formula. Some people detect a metallic taste in foods in which it’s used. I avoid ingesting aluminum for health reasons.

You didn’t asked how much baking powder to use, but i’m going to tell you anyway. Combine 1 tablespoon per 2 pounds of wings with your seasoning mix. Toss dried wings in the mix to thoroughly coat them.

Thank you again.

Another tip is to let the wings set in fridge on a rack over night to help dry the skin.

Thanks for the info.

My pleasure.

I always make a 4% brine, the same as sea water.

I’ve seen others go as high as 8%.

You know, I love very much grill chicken wings according to this recipe

Ingredients
3 lbs/1.3 kg chicken wings
2 to 4 large garlic cloves (finely minced)
1 cup/240 ml. fresh lemon juice
1/4 cup/60 ml. olive oil
1 tsp./5 ml. dried thyme
For the Brine:
1/2 cup/120 ml. salt
1/2 cup/120 ml. sugar
1 quart/1 L water
Steps to Make It
Brine and Grill the Wings:
Mix the salt, sugar and water together.

Put wings in a one gallon, resealable plastic bag along with the brine and allow to marinate in fridge for about an hour and a half. Discard brine.

Prepare your grill for indirect cooking and grill wings turning occasionally so as to brown evenly.

Prepare the Lemon Sauce:
On a cutting board sprinkle a little salt on the minced garlic and mash together to form a paste.

Heat the oil and garlic together in a sauce pan over low heat for a couple of minutes to allow the garlic to become very aromatic.

Mix the oil and garlic with the lemon juice in a glass baking pan (or bowl) and set aside.

Finishing the Grill:
When wings have about 15 to 20 minutes left (total grilling time should be an hour to an hour and a quarter) remove them from grill and roll them around in the lemon sauce and return to grill.

After another 10 minutes baste the wings with the lemon sauce.

When the wings are ready coat them one last time with the lemon sauce and serve them puppies up.

There seems to be a present day fad of combining cooking strategies which in no way appealed to me. Like foam on every plate in eating places, it disappeared once all people become doing it.

Is it a Fad or Trend?

You are correct, fads are short lived as they frequently don’t making a lasting culinary contribution. Cooking techniques, Sous Vide for example, may start as a fad, then become a trend, and endure as a result of their contribution to gastronomy.

However i disagree, combinations may not appeal to you, but sous vide is successfully combined with grilling or broiling to substantially improve outcomes.